As technology becomes more prevalent in our lives, it is increasingly important for students to familiarize with computers at a young age. Many schools are starting to designate computers to students because of the importance of developing technological experience. Likewise, teaching methods evolve as education demand shifts, teachers are starting to expand their lessons into the realm of computers. Screen-sharing is, and should be a popular tool in the classroom, since it’s a helpful tool to engage students in many parts of the lesson, which we will discuss throughout this post.

Screen Share

Why Screen Sharing?

There is pros and cons to everything, even students having computers. One of its advantages is an improvement from the traditional whiteboard, students can take advantage of a lesson right in front of them. There is a reason to the growing number of companies that are using screen-sharing to train new recruits. Screen sharing can sometimes even be required during demos, document displays, and certain presentations. Teachers can also offer remote support if a student is struggling with the lesson.

Visual > Audio Learning

Have you ever tried to learn a new math equation from a podcast? If you haven’t and learned math in a classroom like a normal person, imagine how hard it would be to learn something complex through the ear. This would not happen with screen sharing, and students don’t have to crowd around a single computer for the lesson, and can get a good view in their seats. Having computers around students can lead to different distractions which can be potentially curbed with the closeness and intrigue of screen-sharing.

Collaboration on Computers

The students can already get an in-depth look at the demonstration, gaining visual experience and eliminating questions. However, there are two sides to screen sharing, if a student has trouble with specific parts of the lesson, they can screen share with the teacher for direct guidance on the topic. This opens up a new avenue for technological collaboration, as students can work on projects together online, not needing to be physically present.